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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 198 (some duplicates have been removed)
at the ones that could be sucking up a lot of energy every time we use them. >>> plus a look back at the life and legacy of a longtime maryland legislator who died after being pulled from a fire at her home. >>> the ravens get a super send-off before they sgloosh and a drag race closes a runway at a popular airport. the lamborghini showdown still ahead. >>> kids who are home-schooled in virginia, they may soon get a chance to play sports at public high schools. today the so-called tebow bill took another attempt at passing, named after the nfl star who was alloyed to play football. virginia lawmakers first introduced this bill in 2005, but it has failed every year since. opponents say the bill gives home-schooled children trying to make a team an unfair advantage, because they don't have the same academic criteria as public school athletes. ♪ we got two tickets to paradise ♪ >> no, he didn't. >> that's safety ed reed, helping to get the crowd excited, with the rally at the inner harbor. >>> two blowers and two teams very similar to each other. they touched down in the big easy just an hou
right there and we should use it. it's energy. fracking, for example, has created 1,750,000 jobs in less than two years. billions and billions of dollars going to the states and the federal coffers. we have more energy than anybody in the world. and if we -- in an environmentally friendly way -- acquire it, go on the federal lands, do it in the right way, we'll get that extra piece of cash and bring manufacturing and jobs back to the united states or create them in the united states because of our energy. >> the last four years of the obama presidency was marred by not great relationships between the business community and the administration. you are one of the key faces of the business community. have you reached out to the president or has he reached out to you since his election to say let's make this four years look very different? >> just remember my job's to represent the business people, he's the president of the united states. >> right. >> we deal with each other when we should and when we need to, and sometimes we agree, sometimes we don't. >> but do you have a good relationship
while reasserting american global energy leadership. even balancing the budget will be easier with this initiative. congress and the administration should begin conversation about a broad-based carbon tax. this would give the right signals on energy sources and use. it could raise money to reduce the deficit, restore our infrastructure, speed and finance conservation. there are a number of other commonsense steps that would make progress on carbon pollution and energy conservation goals more significant. the epa should stop dragging its feet permitting old coal plants to continue to spew forth toxic waste, harming the environment and the health of our citizens. it is past time the clean air act reinforced. make sure there are proper safeguards for the cracking technology. make sure this reservoir of inexpensive gas does not undercut the addition of renewables to our energy portfolio. solar, wind, geothermal. dership on these technologies for a balanced energy portfolio and ultimately to reduce our carbon footprint. at each step, we should be looking to enhance energy conservat
with the u.s. energy revolution, aring if to help us this year on the economy. let's bring in our ace investors, david goldman, former head of income grout at bank of america and michael farr, author of "restoring our american dream, the best investment. abigail doolittle, the investors killed it after hours. >> i think what's going on is an important inflexion point. we had another earnings miss, another guide down. this once superstar amongst the text stock has been falling for a few months. i think traders answered vestors were waiting for this report to see what the future with look like. unfortunately it's not as bright as some might have hoped for and that's now showing up in the stock. >> is there an offset here? google did very well today and revenue was very good. apple versus google consideration apple stop this rally? i don't think so but i want to get your take on this. what does it mean apple is doing badly? is it an apple thing, an economy thing or consumer thing or what? >> i think that's a great question. i think right now i tend to agree with you. i think investors wi
and more energy. the world needs more energy. where's it going to come from? ♪ ♪ that's why right here in australia, chevron is building one of the biggest natural gas projects in the world. enough power for a city the size of singapore for 50 years. what's it going to do to the planet? natural gas is the cleanest conventional fuel there is. we've got to be smart about this. it's a smart way to go. ♪ ♪
debut album. how you ask? with 5-hour energy. i get hours of energy now -- no crash later. wait to see the next five hours. those spots are actually leftover food and detergent residue that can redeposit on your dishware during the rinse cycle. gross. jet-dry rinse agent helps wash them away so the only thing left behind is the shine. jet-dry rinses away residues for a sparkling shine. but they haven't experienced extra strength bayer advanced aspirin. in fact, in a recent survey, 95% of people who tried it agreed that it relieved their headache fast. visit fastreliefchallenge.com today for a special trial offer. visit fastreliefchallenge.com excuse me, sir i'm gonna have to ask you to power down your little word game. i think your friends will understand. oh no, it's actually my geico app...see? ...i just uh paid my bill. did you really? from the plane? yeah, i can manage my policy, get roadside assistance, pretty much access geico 24/7. sounds a little too good to be true sir. i'll believe that when pigs fly. ok, did she seriously just say that? geico. just click away with our free m
and more powerful storms. the path toward sustainable energy sources will belong and sometimes difficult. but america cannot resist this transition. we must leave it. we cannot cede this, must climates prague -- its promise. that is how we will maintain our economic vitality and our national parks, forests, waterways, snowcapped peaks. that is how we will preserve our planet, commanded to our care. that is what will lend meaning to the creek our fathers once declared. >> there was a lot of time spent on climate change. was that a surprise? guest: i think people expected climate change to get a shout out along with immigration, gun control the environment of trinity was really been very surprised challenge mentioning god. it got a huge and a huge chunk of time, almost more than any other policy issues. that was a real surprise. host: it was an issue we did not hear a lot about on the campaign .rail paria guest: that was by design. his advisers have made it clear that they did not see that as winning -- as a winning campaign issue. although it is something the president did care about, it
of the denying quorum and in the case of speaking as long as you cou could, you had to spend time and energy, you had to organize and it was visible before this body. it was visible before the reporters gathered in the balcony. therefore, the american people, long before there was a television camera here, could see what you were doing and the public could provide feedback on that. but now we come to the modern era. from 1970 forward. in which it became popular to start using the objection as an instrument of party warfare, the objection to a final vote. you know, if we turn back before 1970, you had an overlap of the parties of perhaps 30 members. and so if one had used his objection, they'd have a good sense that you would be able to get cloture. furthermore, there was a social contract that you only interrupted the workings of this body on an issue of deep principle. you only blockaded the operations of the senate on an issue of profound concern to your state. not as a routine instrument of party politics. but that's changed over the last 45 years, since 1970 forward, the last 43 years, in whi
. and more powerful storms. the path toward sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult. but america cannot resist this transition. we must lead it. >> you'll recall with the exception of a single line in his dnc speech, our current state of climate peril was barely mentioned in the campaign. in fact, it was the first time in 24 years it was never raised at any of the debates. so, i was not the only commentator who was surprised to find such a passionate, lengthy passage in his speech. a speech, of course, is just that. often we have a tendency to overestimate just how much presidential rhetoric can accomplish. right after the speech the new york times ran an article with the headline, speech gives climate goal center stage. president obama masetting in motion what democrats say will be a deliberate pace, aggressive campaign built around use of executive powers to sidestep congressional opposition. libertarian author gene healey coined it cult of the, a quasi figure, directing the nation's attention and resources at a whim. and in the sphere of national security that is
't think you can tell that by the dance floor. you guys know how to cut a rug. >> i get energy from the music. >> reporter: a different mood at the gaylord national hotel in baltimore. >> we had important ballot questions, all of which passed. that said we're all in this together. >> reporter: crowds left the ballroom to watch the ravens make it to the super bowl. >> yeah, i got a peak at the game. >> reporter: good people, good food. tell them about the maryland crab cakes. >> they were excellent. very good. >> reporter: twin sisters monica and veronica say it's mr. obama's second term that will be more historic than the first. >> it has been a little difficult, but we still have faith in him. >> reporter: i'm still salivating, because we saw the crab cakes come and go and never got to taste them. maybe we can get a doggy bag on the way out. but a party is still rocking and a ravens' win. hard to put yourself to bed, right? but many of us, thousands, have an early start tomorrow. i will see you at the inaugural ball at the convention center tomorrow at news4 at 6:00 and 11:00. we'r
sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult. america cannot resist this transition. we must lead it. we cannot cede to other nations the power of jobs and technologies. we must claim its promise. >> strong, clear words from a president considered not green enough by environment lists in his first term. it's true, the president has a lot of work to do but instead of chastising him, maybe it's time for the green movement itself to reimagine what it ought to look like. the modern green movement must be an inclusive one and close the green gab that exists between national and environmental organizations and justice organizations. the environmental problems in inner cities and rural areas ok pied by low income communities of color deserve as much attention as the fracking. at the end of the day, the environmental problem that is happen over there, whether in the mall deese or usa, it will affect us. joining us, the nation magazine. victoria an nbc latino con tr contribut contributor. mike, the executive director of the schoolkill center and peggy executive director of west h
. the path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult, but america cannot resist this transition. we must lead it. we cannot cede to other nations the technology that will power new jobs and industry. we must claim its promise. that's how we will maintain our economic vitality and our national presence of forests and waterways, snow-capped peaks, crop lands. and how we will preserve our planet, commanded to our care by god. that is what will lend meaning to the creed our fathers once declared. host: the wall street journal on climate change has this. in flushing, new york, an independent. how are you? caller: good morning. i liked his speech, because it was different from the last one, because it concentrated on how to make america a better country rather than being the military police for the world. he was tempted to talk about north africa and al qaeda and all these things, but he wants to make america stronger. cost is too much. america is not respected, even spending all this money. how to make america big and strong, how to teach our kids, how to respect peop
by allstate. click or call. the natural energy of peanuts and delicious, soft caramel. to fill you up and keep you moving, whatever your moves. payday. fill up and go! >> john: welcome back to "viewpoint." problems' inauguration speech was one of the clearest calls for progressive agenda ever delivered by an american president. but behind every dramatic policy hope is a smaller political battle. something that the president at times has seemingly been less than enthusiastic to engage in. while we might applaud the principles the president spoke of today, really the bigger speech comes in three weeks. because on february 12th president obama will give the blueprint for his second term when he delivers his fifth state of the union address. but as he talks of immigration policies, gay rights, climate change, and of course gun control he will not be in front of 800 screaming supporters. instead he'll be talking to a republican controlled house whose entire platform consists of ignoring every single one of those issues. so, joining me once again is the nation's george zornick and joining
's oil industry credit line. investments from chinese, india, and russian energy companies reportedly drying up. chavez had the fourth cancer related surgery on september 11th, but has not been seen or heard from since then. coming up on money, the economic forum wrapping up, and surprise, surprise, they didn't solve any of the world's problems. maybe because it was more like a billionaires frat party. about the over the top excess; plus, a squatter makes his dreams come true. he is living large in an enormous florida mansion. i mean, this place is really nice, a ridiculous law may allow him to keep it. you definitely want to see this one. i think maybe i can learn something from this. you ever have too much "money" or too many mansions? i don't think so. i don't think so. ♪ i look up to a lot of the older heads, you know, the innovators, the heads of the art movements of the past. they kept it really edgy, and, like, a lot of the latin american muralists and the latin american artists, their styles are very unique and new to their time, you know, somewhat controversial, but that's
of raging fires and crippling drought and more powerful storms. the path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult, but america cannot resist this transition. we must lead it. >> well, rush limbaugh challenged him today because people who are listening to rush are driving cars and using up fossil fuel and they're not driving smart cars or priuses. no, they're driving big gas burners, but the fact is there's still that sort of know-nothingism, if you will, that -- i'm trying to think of the great word. you don't believe in anything. luddites. is this going to change things? >> maybe not, but it was sort of symbolic of the whole address which is that it's time to stop having sort of side debates over issues we no longer can deny. >> how about balanced argument? there's really -- in other words, some things have been decided by science. >> correct. and, you know, we spent a good two years now talking about the huge threat that our debt is when arguably the warming of the planet, which could be irreversible, is a much larger threat than our national debt. what obam
in this country in part because you do have a great source of energy, right? american energy is playing right into timken's hands. >> well, in the united states, we have a good energy supply, but more than that, the change in the energy markets is creating a great opportunity for us. the growth of a domestic natural gas market -- drilling market, domestic fraccing market is creating a great opportunity for timken products. and that's part of what's driving our profitability. >> now, after i saw you and spent some time in your plant and with your terrific people. i came to understand that timken, sorry for using this word, but it's a wholistic experience. doing a lot of terrific products and there's some guy who buys a lot of stock and says we ought to break up timken, tell me if you think i'm wrong, but i think that the parts are actually augmented by the whole, not worth more than the whole. >> yeah, there's no question about that. we leverage the synergies between all parts of our business to create value. in fact, just this quarter, we started delivering on a major contract with one of the
equal time with the more sane members of the right. >> exactly. the energy of the party is with the richard mourdock crowd. isn't bobby jindal the same guy who signed off on teaching creationism in schools as science? he hasn't been -- >> equal time again. >> exactly. the problem is, too, i think the consultants in the party, the political class understands they need to change, and bobby jindal is an ambitious guy. he understands for them to be viable as presidential candidates, they need to change, but i don't even think they 100% believe it's possible because if the political class believed you could change the base, they wouldn't be trying these shenanigans like changing the electoral college so the rural counties could give a guy a state -- >> you're right, joy. i think they keep looking for ways to cheat. on the demographic thing, they face a real threat. either they embrace hispanics, begin to get a chunk of the african-american vote or they are doomed. we're not making this up. this is all coming out as fresh news. if you thought republicans had learned their less
to become energy self-sufficient north america. but let's face it, one of the most bullish tenants of the turn in the united states is cheap energy in the form of big oil finds. and about the lowest natural gas prices in the world. i can say, sure, flaring's a nightmare, or i could say could you imagine the number of jobs this will create down the road? remember, every day around here we get companies making moves to bring out value. how many times have we urged hess to break itself up and focus on the incredible oil and gas properties? today they did just that. caused the stock to roar $3.50, 6% on the news. this stock is not done going up. no, not at all. we understand some of this move might be motivated by a hedge fund. they would want some board seats, i say who cares. i just like the newfound value which, again, is not done being brought out. we've got the same thing going on over at transocean, symbol r.i.g. where carl icahn, yes, the one who accused our own scott wapner of bullying, he's brought up a 5.6% stay, he's agitating for a $4 dividend. it's not done. finally there'
at limited resources. climate change is a big issue you have been concerned on. the global energy needs are going to increase about 50%, that emissions are going to go up significantly primarily because of china and india and we could do significant harm to the u.s. economy i think by putting additional rules and regulations with very little impact on the global climate. in this tight budget environment with so many competing american priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought into limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy, not help us as a country and not help us globally in perhaps the efforts you might be pursuing. i don't know if you have specific thoughts. >> i do. i have a lot of specific thoughts on it more than we have time now. and i'm not going to abuse that privilege. but i will say this to you, the solution to climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the downsides that you are expressing concern about, and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues of this.
: the drought situation, its impact on food prices and energy prices. our two guests will be here and our phone lines are divided regionally. let's go back to some of the numbers. production decreases and apples, asparagus, coffee, increases in peanuts, dry beans, barley, oats, wheat, and potatoes. guest: when you look at the crops that had significant decreases first, we had a mild winter, a late freeze behind that. that hurts the past zero crop, and asparagus, we have seen a continual decline in acreage. 9.7% decrease is acreage-base. poor pollination in washington state. grapefruit production is down 7.4%. we had high dropout rate-- high drought rates in florida. " weather affected strawberry production, primarily in california. host: chuck abbott, how does this compare to previous years? guest: on the major field crops, there was a major impact. wheat farmers were lucky in that their major variety is winter wheat. they were able to harvest the crop before the drought hit. because they were encouraged to grow more wheat, they escaped the brunt of the drought. corn production was down signifi
it out for you. here's denver, a little piece of this energy that's the snow falling in the rockies is going to break off. and watch what happens as we head toward sunday, we're going to watch about noon, 1:00 tomorrow morning, this energy area with ice. that pink delineating where the ice is begins to move in. and then sunday night, you can see about 9:00, it's ice for chicago. and why it's ice is not snow is the air at the ground is below freezing, but the air at a higher altitude is above freezing. so it's kind of coming down not as snow, but as liquid. and then freezing on the ground and that's where we're seeing once again. and then watch from sunday into monday, the this with ice and snow moves into the northeast. we'll get that. but then we'll kind of move through that. in terms of the temperatures, look at chicago, 44 on monday, only in the 20s today. the access of that warming moves eastward. so cleveland in the 50s, louisville at 70, they were just ensconced in ice. and then on wednesday, raleigh, richmond in the 70s. the access of the warmth pushes eastward and we pick up
to be a fast mover. it's not really tapping a lot of moisture. it will have energy with it as it moves on through and it will be a fast process. i think we'll get what we'll get between now and before the time the sun comes up. maybe lingering flurries for the morning rush hour. but this weak low with its fast movement could deposit just enough snow to make for some slippery spots and the crews are out trying to treat the roads, but the pavement is colder than the air temperature, which is mighty cold. we are worried any snow that we get together, powdery and light as it will be, will be quick to stick. so most everything should be covered, at least those areas that get the snow. far to the north, might not get too much. in the district, it will be closer to a dusting. those untreated surfaces will be slick. there could be some delays. the best chance is south of d.c., because there is an area that could get more. and then we'll be tracking a second system that might be more widespread for friday. we'll talk more about that and get an update on temperatures. they have dropped here at 1
how to put in a well,look, every day we're using more and more energy. the world needs more energy. where's it going to come from? ♪ that's why right here, in australia, chevron is building one of the biggest natural gas projects in the world. enough power for a city the size of singapore for 50 years. what's it going to do to the planet? natural gas is the cleanest conventional fuel there is. we've got to be smart about this. it's a smart way to go. ♪ >> announcer: it's "the tonight show with jay leno," featuring rickey minor and "the tonight show" band.
all of my energies to working with my fellow commissioners and the extremely dedicated and talented men and women of the staff of the s.e.c. to fulfill the agency's mission to protect investors, and to ensure the strength, efficiency, and transparency of our capital markets. >> sreenivasan: the president re-nominated richard cordray to lead the consumer financial protection bureau. the former ohio attorney general has held that position for the last year, but his temporary appointment will expire in december. >> we understand that our mission is to stand on the side of consumers: our mothers and fathers, sisters and brothers, sons and daughters and see that they're treated fairly. for more than a year we've been focused on making consumer finance markets work better for the american people. we approach this work with open minds, open ears, and great determination. >> sreenivasan: the president initially used a recess appointment to put cordray in the job, to get around senate republican opposition. senate leaders agreed today on a plan to limit the use of filibusters, at least somew
that energy in a very constructive way to support incumbents that we have, particularly in those tough districts or states that we can barely hold on to, like a georgia. i mean, that seat could come in play, depending who that nominee is. and the party has to give that some great consideration. >> that substantive critique from you and the different strands of substantive critique about what happened in 2012 and what is wrong inside the party and the structure of the party makes it so remarkable to me that reince priebus was unopposed. i find it astonishing. >> yeah, me too. >> michael steele, msnbc analyst, former chairman of the party, thank you for your time tonight. it's great to see you back. >> all right, rachel. >>> president obama has made his choice to run the s.e.c. the agency that is supposed to police wall street. there are very few people, like maybe zero people who know more about the nominee or the job of the nominee than our special guest tonight, former new york governor and attorney general elliott spitser is here. yes! stay tuned. impact life expectancy in the u.s.,
developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> welcome back to the second half of "outfront." we start with stories we care about where we focus with reporting from the front lines. today on the two-year anniversary of the egyptian revolution that ousted hosni mubarak from power, the streets were filled not with peace but with violence. protesters for and against president mohamed morsi clashed with police, at least seven died. morsi did not address the country but tweeted on twitter. he called on people to uphold the noble principles of the revolution. >>> apple is no longer the world's biggest company. the title belongs to exxonmobil. apple shares plummeted on the heels of disappointing earnings resulted and plunged over 12%. apple's market cap first passed exxonmobil on august 9th, 2011. it's been sitting pretty 18 months, seemingly untouchable. tonight it is
started on facebook and it has turned into this behind me. miguel? >> what's the energy like? i done sense there's a lot of energy that that crowd. how big is it? are they really sort of, you know, getting after this? >> reporter: i think one of the things that people here talk about is the fact that this started with social media. this was the brainchild of two people who said right in the hours after newtown we've got to do something. what can they do. they decided to organize this march. it's only been a few weeks in the making. a lot of p people who are marching feel that this many people have gathered from across the country as a result of social media. they feel that is good. however, they're very realistic knowing that the legislation that they are pushing for and hoping that congress will pass, things like reinstating the assault weapons ban, that that faces an uphill battle and they know this is at the very least only a beginning start. miguel? >> emil emily schmidt, thank yoy much. >>> a bitter arctic storm is unleashing misery across much of the midwest, north atlantic, and nort
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 198 (some duplicates have been removed)